Forums Archive RPGMP3 Chatter Fashionista Gamers Science fiction as a trend?

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 19 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #556644
    MorkilRocks
    • Posts : 873
    • Gelatinous Cube

    How far reaching is the Science Fiction genre? Futuristic, almost inconceivable, visions from 60 years ago are now commonplace as the multitentacled touch of science fiction attaches itself to several aspects of daily, technological life. But, is Sci Fi a conceivable trend in fashion? Witness these looks from the most recent Russian Fashion Week:

    5596255496_b652033389.jpg

    5595567273_26e1f19bbc.jpg

    I have a very “live and let live” attitude to the way people dress. If you like what you wear, then, wear it. There are several designers that have attached themselves to some aspect of science fiction. Gareth Pugh, Thierry Mugler, Claude Montana and Maria Cornejo all have a ribbon of science fiction that runs through their work. Even on a public outlet like Etsy.com, there are several people making wearable accessories devoted to H.P. Lovecraft’s Cthulhu, Tolkien’s Hobbits and H. G, Wells’ (et al) vision of steampunk.

    Are Sci Fi accoutrements viable accessories and/or looks for modern ready to wear? How feasible is it for a woman/man living in 2011 to dress like this and not feel out of place? Should this futuristic vision of design be relegated to role playing, conventions, cos-play and fantasy events?

    Your thoughts are welcome…

    #628694
    wolfsnap
    • Posts : 470
    • Thri-kreen

    My own experience is that people just don’t dress up anymore. You rarely see anything besides:

    Bland Business attire

    Bland Business Casual

    Jeans and Tees

    I’m guilty myself – of course, I’m older and much more sedate now than I was in my youth, so comfort tends to be the deciding factor over making any kind of a statement.

    As for Sci-Fi: I think there will always be a small market for that kind of thing, but it’s for people who want to push the envelope. In my younger days I had a MUCH more interesting wardrobe – I wore unusual items, and I did sometimes feel out of place, but it was intentional. These days I couldn’t get away with it – I’m no longer young or thin enough. 😛

    #628695
    Ieqo
    • Posts : 1090
    • Owlbear
    MorkilRocks wrote:
    Are Sci Fi accoutrements viable accessories and/or looks for modern ready to wear? How feasible is it for a woman/man living in 2011 to dress like this and not feel out of place? Should this futuristic vision of design be relegated to role playing, conventions, cos-play and fantasy events?

    Your thoughts are welcome…

    Like almost everything, I’d say it depends on the venue; one can get away with wearing a lot of stuff in Tokyo or Hollywood that would make them victims of hate crime in Chattanooga, for example. 😛

    My own philsophy (there’s that dirty word again…) is this: wear whatever you want, just don’t go whining to the ACLU if I choose to laugh at you.

    #628696
    undecided44
    • Posts : 73
    • Bullywug
    MorkilRocks wrote:

    — snip —

    Are Sci Fi accoutrements viable accessories and/or looks for modern ready to wear? How feasible is it for a woman/man living in 2011 to dress like this and not feel out of place? Should this futuristic vision of design be relegated to role playing, conventions, cos-play and fantasy events?

    Your thoughts are welcome…

    I think the US society in particular is not ready for the sort of everyday wear that is common in sci-fi settings, though they seem to welcome the sort of hand-held technology that is pervasive in same. Though I’m certain that the Romans would have had no interest in hoop skirts, and Elizabethan englishmen would have been knocked out by a modern mini-skirt, while the Elizabethan woman would simply speak derisively about it’s wearer to her sister.

    I couldn’t tell you what forward looking followers of fashion from fourty years ago predicted about today with their collections, though I would imagine that the accuracy observed between those designs and present day would roughly coincide with today’s collections and the eventual fashion in years to come.

    Alternatively: bah, it’s just the crazy Russians. I won’t believe it til they’re wearing it in Paris and London.

    #628697
    MorkilRocks
    • Posts : 873
    • Gelatinous Cube
    Quote:
    Alternatively: bah, it’s just the crazy Russians. I won’t believe it til they’re wearing it in Paris and London

    Shown in Paris (Gareth Pugh)- Fall 2008

    5597958520_30572e596c.jpg

    Shown in Paris (Balenciaga)- Fall 2007

    5597378351_f0fb5528d5.jpg

    Shown in Paris (Rick Owens) – Spring 2011

    5597958540_8c0d94d4ac.jpg

    I do concur with what has been said so far. A: it is a matter of personal choice, B: What one wears is always fodder for public ridicule and C: clothing is a barometer of civilization.

    G 😀

    #628698
    Hal
    Admin
    • Posts : 7754
    • Treant

    I think it all depends in the type of science fiction you are looking at (or reading).

    If you look at more of the “serious” science fiction fashion is almost totally subsumed by utility and comfort. The idea that technology can be included into garments leads them more towards utility.

    Then you generally have the super rich set who are still setting the trend and pulling fashion into the realms of high tech body modifications and the like.

    I would suggest that we are more likely to be wearing a nice comfy jumpsuit than a cyberpunk inspired street samurai costume in the future.

    It all depends in whether you think we are heading for Utopia or Distopia

    🙂

    And even in serious sci-fi there are always entertainers etc who are pushing the bounds of whatever fashion means in that particular future.

    I see a lot of TV and film science fiction in the pictures above. So does that mean that the fashion is derivative of the sci-fi that has already been envisioned?

    Looking at envisioning of classic sci-fi characters they are really just developments of what we wear today (and that’s the point in good sci-fi).

    Molly.jpg

    Molly Millions – Neuromancer

    6a00d8341c630a53ef01156fe5a0a9970c-250wi.jpg

    Ripley – Alien Series

    blade-runner-02-09-tm.jpg

    Pris – Bladerunnder

    I think sci-fi is a good inspiration for fashion but I doubt we are all going to be wandering around dressed like they are in Demolition Man or Barabarella any time soon 😛

    Personally I vote for the outfits for Barbarella 🙂

    battlestar_barbarella.jpg

    Battlestar Galactica Girls in Barabarella photoshoot for GQ

    Hal :hal:

    PS. That first picture creeps in the first post creeps me out. Its like she has no neck. Watching too much mecha anime I feel 🙂

    #628699
    Hal
    Admin
    • Posts : 7754
    • Treant

    Hmmmm – it seems I have made a bunch of statements without really making an argument…

    I guess that’s what happens when you get distracted at work 😛

    Hal :hal:

    #628700
    MorkilRocks
    • Posts : 873
    • Gelatinous Cube

    Jeremy Scott had a spring collection devoted to Barbarella several years ago. In my last semester teaching, I had a student design fabric based on the title sequence to the original Dr. Who; then proceeded to design dresses, with it, that were inspired by Sci Fi girls of the 60’s.

    Blade runner was also noted. Alexander McQueen once did a collection for Givenchy that was almost a direct knockoff of the costumes used in the movie. He even used the same hair and make-up effects. The costumer of Bladerunner saw a clip of the collection and thought McQueen borrowed pieces from the movie archives.

    Quote:
    I see a lot of TV and film science fiction in the pictures above. So does that mean that the fashion is derivative of the sci-fi that has already been envisioned?

    It has been my experience that designers rarely push the boundaries of inspiration. Typically the “trend” emerges as a result of a film or show that has an iconic appeal/look. One designer has success with a bit of inspiration then it gets diffused through the rest of the season or even the following season.

    A few designers look at the idea and tweak it so much that the original inspiration is lost. Theses designers then get referred to as “Avant Garde” even though, the inspiration never really changed.

    #628701
    BigJackBrass
    • Posts : 4638
    • Drider

    There’s no way to think about this subject…

    zardoz.jpg

    … without remembering Zardoz. And at that point any possibly useful contributions from me to the discussion go out of the window.

    #628702
    MorkilRocks
    • Posts : 873
    • Gelatinous Cube
    Quote:
    And at that point any possibly useful contributions from me to the discussion go out of the window.

    I know I’ve been enlightened!

    G 😉

    #628703
    Hal
    Admin
    • Posts : 7754
    • Treant

    I totally avoided that on purpose 🙂

    I knew someone would dig it up and I had my suspicions who it might be 😛

    Hal :hal:

    #628704
    MorkilRocks
    • Posts : 873
    • Gelatinous Cube

    5598896928_001e3aca74_z.jpg

    #628705
    wolfsnap
    • Posts : 470
    • Thri-kreen

    There’s a big difference between “Shown in Paris” and “Worn in Paris”, I think. Or between “Shown” and “Worn” anywhere.

    Sure, there are a lot of crazy sci-fi-fashions that turn up at shows, but nobody is wearing that stuff to work – or even to parties. Even the “glamorous” set these days isn’t really glamorous. Nobody dresses for dinner anymore. 😛

    #628706
    Holdar
    • Posts : 36
    • Flumph

    In general I’m one of T-shirt and jeans folks. But on occasions I dress up rather nicely, albeit either in cyberpunk or steampunk… but I don’t really get all the heckeling like most people. It depends really on the area, I get compliments sometimes, and sniggers other times. It comes down to how open minded the people are, and… how absurd the manner of dressing is.

    #628707
    MorkilRocks
    • Posts : 873
    • Gelatinous Cube
    wolfsnap wrote:
    There’s a big difference between “Shown in Paris” and “Worn in Paris”, I think. Or between “Shown” and “Worn” anywhere.

    Sure, there are a lot of crazy sci-fi-fashions that turn up at shows, but nobody is wearing that stuff to work – or even to parties. Even the “glamorous” set these days isn’t really glamorous. Nobody dresses for dinner anymore. 😛

    Actually, I chose those examples for a reason. 😀 Rick Owens has one of the highest sell-throughs on Net A Porter.com. He functions on a WYSIWYG philosophy for his runway shows. As bizarre as it looks, it usually ships directly to the stores without alteration. The pic from the Balenciaga show was one of the best selling shows they have ever had. The metal-articulated pants were diffused into a pailletted version for the stores; however, the copper filament fiber fabric base was unchanged. And, Gareth Pugh has been making that type of stuff since his lines inception. Again, the clothes get diffused, but he is selling well in high end boutiques. So I guess people are wearing theses types of clothes. Whether or not they constitute a mass market appeal is another question.

    G 😀

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 19 total)
  • The forum ‘Fashionista Gamers’ is closed to new topics and replies.