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Neil Gaiman's 10 Essential Works Ranked

gaiman books ranking

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#1 Hal

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 11:22 AM

I was wandering the net - as I am prone to do when thinking at work and I came across 10 Essential Neil Gaiman Works, Ranked

 

The list was made because of his new book released this week, Truth is a Cave in the Black Mountains: A Tale of Travel and Darkness with Pictures of All Kinds - go pick up a copy and see what you think :)

 

To save you time with the list - I have summarized below. What do you think of the order?

 

10 - Make Good Art - Gaiman's speech to graduates at Philadelphia University in 2012

09 - Stardust

08 - Neverwhere

07 - The Ocean at the End of the Lane

06 - Death: The High Cost of Living

05 - The Graveyard Book

04 - Good Omens - with Terry Pratchett

03 - American Gods

02 - Coraline

01 - The Sandman

 

There are quite a few missing from that list. I have read most of them on this list and have to say I think that Sandman makes a good number 1. I  may rate Neverwhere and Stardust a little higher.

 

What do you think?

 

Hal :hal:


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#2 Tulty

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 06:13 PM

I completely agree with Sandman as No 1. Having not read Good Omens or American Gods (to my shame) I can't really comment on them, but I do think Stardust and Neverwhere are both excellent, and at least Neverwhere deserves to be a bit higher up!
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#3 Thing

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Posted 01 July 2014 - 09:08 AM

yeah, I have trouble ranking is work like that as I like so many of his works for different aspects.  I still might come out with Sandman as #1, but a lot of his works and worlds have rich mythologies and such.  I wonder if Sandman is #1 more because via the many issues he got to tell so many different tales as opposed to a novel that mostly follows 1 tale with hints at others.


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#4 Pencil-Monkey

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Posted 01 July 2014 - 09:43 AM

Is there any record on whether Neil Gaiman contributed anything to Good Omens, apart from his name on the front cover? It reads as pretty much straight-up Pratchett goodness from cover to cover, with (maybe) some Gaiman influence on a few of the demonic scenes.
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#5 Hal

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Posted 01 July 2014 - 04:23 PM

According to the interwebs :)

 

Gaiman said...

 

We were both living in England when we wrote it. At an educated guess, although neither of us ever counted, Terry probably wrote around 60,000 "raw" and I wrote 45,000 "raw" words of Good Omens, with, on the whole, Terry taking more of the plot with Adam and the Them in, and me doing more of the stuff that was slightly more tangential to the story, except that broke down pretty quickly and when we got towards the end we swapped characters so that we'd both written everyone by the time it was done, but then we also rewrote and footnoted each others bits as we went along, and rolled up our sleeves to take the first draft to the second (quite a lot of words), and, by the end of it, neither of us was entirely certain who had written what. It was indeed plotted in long daily phone calls, and we would post floppy disks (and this was back in 1988 when floppy disks really were pretty darn floppy) back and forth.

 

 

Pratchett said...

 

I think this is an honest account of the process of writing Good Omens. It was fairly easy to keep track of because of the way we sent discs to one another, and because I was Keeper of the Official Master Copy I can say that I wrote a bit over two thirds of Good Omens. However, we were on the phone to each other every day, at least once. If you have an idea during a brainstorming session with another guy, whose idea is it? One guy goes and writes 2,000 words after thirty minutes on the phone, what exactly is the process that's happening? I did most of the physical writing because:

 

 

  1. I had to. Neil had to keep Sandman going – I could take time off from the DW;
  2. One person has to be overall editor, and do all the stitching and filling and slicing and, as I've said before, it was me by agreement – if it had been a graphic novel, it would have been Neil taking the chair for exactly the same reasons it was me for a novel;
  3. I'm a selfish bastard and tried to write ahead to get to the good bits before Neil.

Initially, I did most of Adam and the Them and Neil did most of the Four Horsemen, and everything else kind of got done by whoever – by the end, large sections were being done by a composite creature called Terryandneil, whoever was actually hitting the keys. By agreement, I am allowed to say that Agnes Nutter, her life and death, was completely and utterly mine. And Neil proudly claims responsibility for the maggots. Neil's had a major influence on the opening scenes, me on the ending. In the end, it was this book done by two guys, who shared the money equally and did it for fun and wouldn't do it again for a big clock.

 

 

Hal :hal:


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#6 Pencil-Monkey

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Posted 02 July 2014 - 02:03 AM

Neil proudly claims responsibility for the maggots.


Yeah, the maggots definitely seemed like classic Gaiman. ;)
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#7 Hal

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Posted 02 July 2014 - 09:25 AM

Hey - I am diligently copy / pasting this from Wikipedia here :)

 

Hal :hal:


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#8 Pencil-Monkey

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Posted 02 July 2014 - 09:34 AM

Starz, Bryan Fuller Board Neil Gaiman's 'American Gods'

tumblr_n826czqGAe1t52mf4o1_500.png

Hey - I am diligently copy / pasting this from Wikipedia here :)


Fixed. ;)
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#9 Pencil-Monkey

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Posted 26 September 2014 - 05:27 AM

Neil Gaiman: ‘Terry Pratchett isn’t jolly. He’s angry’

Terry Pratchett may strike many as a twinkly old elf, but that’s not him at all. Fellow sci-fi novelist Neil Gaiman on the inner rage that drives his ailing friend’s writing.


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