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Quirky Arms Law results: Hilarity ensues

rolemaster gaming anecdotes tales from the table

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#1 Pencil-Monkey

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Posted 28 January 2014 - 09:17 AM

Reposted from the Iron Crown forums:


This has just happened in my group and since we were all dying with laughter I'll share the situation with you (mods, if this is the wrong forum feel free to move this post).

The situation: The party is sent to investigate a frontier noble's odd behaviour and approach his castle as a snow storm begins. Unbeknowns to the party, the castle's inhabitants were all killed a few days ago - by accident, an artifact in the treasury had conjured a powerful demonic being that ran amok until, after killing everybody else, it ran into its master (chained to the dungeon wall) who banished it but still couldn't free himself.

The party, unawares of the backstory, encounters a mother/kid pair of ogres in the entrance area playing with and feeding on dead humans and horses. Both creatures are slain with little effort and just to be sure their throats are slit. Then they are dragged outside.
Searching the castle, two characters enter the lord's bedchamber and find his corpse. This triggers a ghostly apparition that proclaims they shall leave the castle alive until his murder is avenged. The apparition doesn't actually have the power to place such a geas on the party, it is just a "recorded message". But the characters know that it's technically possible and presume they are under the spell.
Naturally, they first want to find out if the supposed geas only applies to the two who entered the bedchamer, or to the whole party. The dwarf warrior is sent through the gate and the player is told by the GM he's feeling somewhat uncomfortable (because the Dwarf fears he might be under the spell). In lieu with his character (and his talents and flaws), the player decides the Dwarf won't admit to feeling uncomfortable. He refuses to go further away from the gate than the few steps he's taken, returns and claims everything is ok.

Somewhat later, lingering evil demonic power raises the two ogres outside as undead because, unlike the other corpses throughout the castle, they've been dead for only an hour or so ago. The big one returns to the stable to continue eating horses, and makes a lot of noise.

Soo... during the nightly snow storm the party returns to the dark stables and finds a big being at large which they think is papa ogre. Again, it is dispatched rather easily. In the final round of combat, the Dwarf achieves a critical against large creature with his magical mace... and rolls 97, 02 for a total of 99. The priceless magical weapon breaks. (And the ogre was out of hitpoints from the others' attacks anyways, so this particular strike didn't even matter much). The short-tempered (character flaw) Dwarfs flies into a rage over the loss, draws a morningstar and runs outside to see the smaller ogre through the gate. He runs a step or two beyond the gate, attacks the other ogre, wins initiative, rolls 01 (fumble, results inconsequential). The young ogre respons with a claw attack exceeding 250 (cut off at medium claw attack threshold) and scores a 13 C Puncture critical against AT13. Rolls a 93... which would normally mean instant death.

GM intervention decides to treat the AT13 as plate armor in this instance to give the party 9 rounds to do something; the armor is declared destroyed.

From the party's viewpoint, it has been proven beyond reasonable doubt there is a very powerful curse upon them: The two ogres outside became undead, the dwarf who went outside is blessed with phenomenal bad luck and is dying. Yep, they're strongly motivated to solve the adventure... :)

 
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#2 Hal

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Posted 28 January 2014 - 09:33 AM

Funny - I love how things can go so so very wrong in Rolemaster because of the crits.

 

Like when @Lindsay managed to kill my lake worm in a single hit - something I have done as a player to a GM (except I did it with a War Troll and I didn't kill him, I put him into a 6 week coma) and it feels awesome :P

 

That's why Rolemaster rocks. The rules may look massive and terrifying but they really let the story shine...

 

Hal :hal:


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#3 LightPagoda

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Posted 28 January 2014 - 06:21 PM

Those crit tables did sound like good fodder for some interesting gaming stories during the posted games.  I have considered getting the books, but have too many systems I may never get to play as it is.


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#4 Hal

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Posted 28 January 2014 - 07:09 PM

What is this, "too many systems", of which you speak?

 

Hal :hal:


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#5 Pencil-Monkey

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Posted 30 January 2014 - 09:34 AM

What is this, "too many systems", of which you speak?
 
Hal :hal:

 
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#6 Slartibartfast

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Posted 31 January 2014 - 06:54 AM

Those crit tables did sound like good fodder for some interesting gaming stories during the posted games.  I have considered getting the books, but have too many systems I may never get to play as it is.

 

 

What is this, "too many systems", of which you speak?

 

Hal :hal:

 

 

Gotta get'em all!  Hoard the prescious systems!  Read them and digest them instead of attending work or talking to loved ones!

 

Even if you never run a game with them there is usually some cool idea or schtick you can take from it for the next time you play Pathfinder.


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#7 Hal

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Posted 31 January 2014 - 07:55 AM

I have so many systems I have never actually run but bought because, hey why not? It shows the wondrous variety of gaming :P

 

Hal :hal:


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#8 Pencil-Monkey

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Posted 31 January 2014 - 08:50 AM

Reposted from RPG.net:


I strongly agree with the OP. And, more specifically, I think the problem is heavy over production of systems (and editions of systems) rather than setting and supplement materials.

The correct balance is something more like the industry ca. 1980, when there were 3-4 major systems and perhaps a dozen oddball games people knew about, and each major system had a rules set that stayed pretty stable over a decade or more and there was a steady stream of high quality setting materials and supplements. Think of the line of D&D modules, Runequest boxed sets, traveller LBB's.



Who gets to choose what "major systems" and oddball games are produced? Is it me? If so, that's a terrific idea and I support it completely.

If it isn't, that's a terrible idea and I want nothing to do with it.



I personally suggest something akin to the Hunger Games.

 
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