Jump to content

  • Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account
Photo

Choothulu's completely unnecessary fun fact of the day


  • Please log in to reply
30 replies to this topic

#1 Choothulhu

Choothulhu

    Kobold

  • Members
  • 56 posts
  • Amazon Wishlist
  • LocationThe Moon. Cheesey, wot.

Posted 02 October 2013 - 05:04 AM

Today's fun fact is:

 

The collective noun for flamingoes is a fabulous!

 

See you tomorrow, boys and girls!

 

Cx


  • 0

#2 Pencil-Monkey

Pencil-Monkey

    Kyton

  • Site Artist
  • 5,831 posts

Posted 02 October 2013 - 06:39 AM

Are you sure? There's a lot of sources (online, mind you, so their veracity may be slanting somewhat towards the dubious end of the scale) that claim that a group of flamingos can be referred to by different collective nouns, including a "colony", "flamboyance", "flurry", "regiment", or "stand" of flamingos.

Haven't find anyone who refers to them as a "fabulous" of flamingos, though. Is "fabulous" even a noun?
 


  • 0

#3 Pencil-Monkey

Pencil-Monkey

    Kyton

  • Site Artist
  • 5,831 posts

Posted 02 October 2013 - 06:39 AM

Other avian collective nouns:

    Birds of Prey (hawks, falcons): Cast, cauldron, kettle
    Cormorants: Flight
    Coots: Covert
    Crows: Murder, congress, horde
    Ducks: Raft, team, paddling
    Eagles: Convocation, congregation
    Finches: Charm
    Flamingos: Flamboyance
    Game Birds (quail, grouse, ptarmigan): Covey, pack, bevy
    Geese: Skein, wedge, gaggle, plump


  • 0

#4 Pencil-Monkey

Pencil-Monkey

    Kyton

  • Site Artist
  • 5,831 posts

Posted 02 October 2013 - 06:40 AM

2009-10-30-566nouns.gif


  • 0

#5 generalofdisorder

generalofdisorder

    Kobold

  • Members
  • 92 posts
  • LocationAnchorage AK

Posted 02 October 2013 - 07:15 AM

 Is "fabulous" even a noun?
 

 

Fabulousness would be the noun form.

 

A busyness of ferrets, a tower of giraffes, a mischief of mice, an ambush if tigers.


  • 1

#6 Thing

Thing

    a Bad Man

  • Administrators
  • 12,601 posts
  • LocationNear Seattle, WA, USA

Posted 02 October 2013 - 07:51 AM

I believe @Choothulhu said these are fun facts, that may be different than factual facts


  • 2

#7 PrestoJeff

PrestoJeff

    Stirge

  • Members
  • 453 posts
  • LocationSilicon Valley, California

Posted 02 October 2013 - 11:50 AM

A Congress of idiots....
  • 0

#8 Choothulhu

Choothulhu

    Kobold

  • Members
  • 56 posts
  • Amazon Wishlist
  • LocationThe Moon. Cheesey, wot.

Posted 02 October 2013 - 01:35 PM

A Congress of idiots....

 

 

Surely that's only if you shut down the government of a country? :P

 

Re a fabulous of flamingoes - I heard it on radio. Serves me right for not fact-checking, eh. 


  • 0

#9 Aethyr

Aethyr

    Frog

  • Members
  • 340 posts
  • Amazon Wishlist
  • LocationVirginia

Posted 02 October 2013 - 02:24 PM

Seems like a good place to share about a grouping of comedians, which I have heard is called a Heckle or sometimes a Bitter.


  • 0

#10 Slartibartfast

Slartibartfast

    Ghoul

  • Patrons
  • 921 posts
  • Amazon Wishlist
  • LocationMelbourne

Posted 02 October 2013 - 02:43 PM

I heard that the collective noun for owls was a parliament.

 

That gets me wondering who was it who decides these; it sounds like some politicians are just trying to improve their image but then the collective noun for politicians is apparently an equivocation...

 

 

Learning is growing!


  • 0

#11 Choothulhu

Choothulhu

    Kobold

  • Members
  • 56 posts
  • Amazon Wishlist
  • LocationThe Moon. Cheesey, wot.

Posted 03 October 2013 - 03:25 AM

Fun fact for today:

 

Melbourne, Australia, could have been called Batman, after John Batman, who played a large part in founding the settlement*. In his honour, there is a train station called Batman in the Northwest of the city.**

 

*Fact-checked! Well, wiki-checked, quoting this: Billot, C.P. (1979). John Batman : the Story of John Batman and the Founding of Melbourne. Melbourne : Hyland House. ISBN 0-908090-18-8

**Googlemaps!


  • 1

#12 Hal

Hal

    Site Owner

  • Administrators
  • 8,091 posts
  • Amazon Wishlist
  • LocationHouston, TX

Posted 03 October 2013 - 07:19 AM

I totally want to change my name to Mr Batman. How great would that be?

 

"Oh, hi there. I'm Hal Batman. No no. It is really my name. You can just call me Batman. Or The Batman."

 

I think @Lindsay wouldn't mind being Lindsay Batman. I think it has a nice ring to it and would certainly help her fashion career. I mean how could it fail?

 

Hal :hal:


  • 0

#13 BigJackBrass

BigJackBrass

    Whartson Hall Gamer

  • Administrators
  • 4,601 posts
  • Amazon Wishlist
  • LocationStalybridge

Posted 03 October 2013 - 07:24 AM

I totally want to change my name to Mr Batman. How great would that be?

 

 

And then you could get a job as a batman. What larks!  :D


  • 0

#14 Choothulhu

Choothulhu

    Kobold

  • Members
  • 56 posts
  • Amazon Wishlist
  • LocationThe Moon. Cheesey, wot.

Posted 03 October 2013 - 09:17 AM

And then you could get a job as a batman. What larks!  :D

 

"Hi, I'm Hal Batman, I'm the symbol this site needs" :ph34r:

 

 

Dude!!!! 


  • 1

#15 PrestoJeff

PrestoJeff

    Stirge

  • Members
  • 453 posts
  • LocationSilicon Valley, California

Posted 03 October 2013 - 02:17 PM

How about Hal Jordan? Or Hal 9000?
  • 0

#16 Choothulhu

Choothulhu

    Kobold

  • Members
  • 56 posts
  • Amazon Wishlist
  • LocationThe Moon. Cheesey, wot.

Posted 04 October 2013 - 02:54 AM

Fun fact of the day:

 

Tigers share 96% of their genes with the common cat.* 

 

Bonus fact: Our cat Toby shares the rest of his genes with the common sloth**. 

 

*Personal Genomics Institute, Genome Research Foundation,Suwon, South Korea

** I've seen the little bugger. Believe, blud!


  • 0

#17 Pencil-Monkey

Pencil-Monkey

    Kyton

  • Site Artist
  • 5,831 posts

Posted 07 October 2013 - 09:06 AM

Fun fact: Niesamowite is Polish for 'awesome'.
 


  • 0

#18 Slartibartfast

Slartibartfast

    Ghoul

  • Patrons
  • 921 posts
  • Amazon Wishlist
  • LocationMelbourne

Posted 08 October 2013 - 05:56 AM

Fun fact: Niesamowite is Polish for 'awesome'.
 

 

How does one pronounce Niesamowite?


  • 0

#19 Chewzter

Chewzter

    Goblin

  • Members
  • 193 posts

Posted 08 October 2013 - 07:32 AM

A Platypus nurses its young by "sweating" out milk.

 

Also, male platypusseses(I don't even...) are venomous.

 

Also, they can detect electric fields.


  • 1

#20 Pencil-Monkey

Pencil-Monkey

    Kyton

  • Site Artist
  • 5,831 posts

Posted 08 October 2013 - 07:58 AM

How does one pronounce Niesamowite?

 
Perhaps unsurprisingly, it's complicated.
 

Actually the answer is not as simple, as you were led to believe, because - irrespective of the gender - the adjectives niesamowity, niesamowita and niesamowite may have several meanings: the original one, and then the transformed one. [The word "niewiarygodny", which you are tracking in another thread, follows the similar process.]

Since the adjective "nie-samowity" starts with the negation "nie" the question is: is there a word "samowity"? Well, not in the current use, but it existed in Old Polish and its etymology is somewhat related to the word "sam" and the verbs "widzieć" or "wiedzieć", which are - by the way - also related, not only in Slavic languages. With rough approximation the word "samowity" derives from "samo-wit' ", "samo-widzieć", "samemu widzieć". I would not be surprised if the modern fashionable "samowiedza" had the same root. In any event "Opowieści samowite" by Wojciech Kuszczok might be worth to read in order to explore the concept.

The last dictionary of Polish language, which still carried the definition of adjective "samowity", was "Słownik języka polskiego" PWN 1958-1969, edited by W. Doroszewski. "Samowity" was defined as "naturalny, przyrodzony" - natural, innate.

So, in opposition to that the adjective "niesamowity" would mean "weird, unnatural, eery, uncanny". And that's the basic meaning in all three genders: masculine, feminine, neuter.

It might be worth pointing out that German language has similar pair of adjectives, although their meanings do not map exactly to Polish, which is due to different historical culture involving vampires and all that stuff:
heimliche => tajemny, skryty, sekretny, tajny, ukryty
unheimliche => niesamowity, przedziwny, tajemniczy, straszny, złowieszczy

As I already pointed out, meaning of the words change. As the English word "terrific" has transformed from "frightening, fearsome, horrible" to become "great, wonderful and splendid" so the Polish "niesamowity" became "amazing".

The More You Know!

the-more-you-know-o.gif


  • -1




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Gravityscan Badge